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The volumes consigned to the flames in Berlin, and more than 30 other university towns around the country on that and following nights, included works by more than 75 German and foreign authors, among them (to cite but a few) Walter Benjamin, Bertolt Brecht, Albert Einstein, Friedrich Engels, Sigmund Freud, André Gide, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, Lenin, Jack London, Heinrich, Klaus and Thomas Mann, Ludwig Marcuse, Karl Marx, John Dos Passos, Arthur Schnitzler, Leon Trotsky, HG Wells, Émile Zola and Stefan Zweig. Also among the authors whose books were burned that night was the great 19th-century German poet Heinrich Heine, who barely a century earlier, in 1821, had written in his play Almansor the words: “Dort, wo man Bücher verbrennt, verbrennt man am Ende auch Menschen” – “Where they burn books, they will, in the end, also burn people.”

Jon Henley

via wood s lot

 

…the moment you take for granted that a metaphor is the equivalent of the thing it describes or points to, is the moment when that metaphor is effectively dead. It’s worse than useless for thinking with. But usually people go on using such metaphors long after they’ve ceased to generate any new ideas–which is one of the things a metaphor is supposed to help us do. People will just keep walking on in the resulting conceptual daze, because to think about it is like looking at the end of the world. Some will invest heavily in re-animating the corpse and blame the demise on the usual suspects: the all-powerful and infinitely devious upstart poor and other outsiders.  Kia in comments at the Gift Hub

via wood s lot

cross-posted at mirabile dictu

 

 

dd_litcity_map

Literary Map of San Francisco

Based on a similar map of St Petersburg by Vera Evstafieva and Andrew Biliter (**), this one places city-relevant quotes on a San Francisco map, where possible on the district the quote relates to. San Francisco Bay, cable cars, the Mission, the Tenderloin District and Chinatown are all name-checked in this map, which quotes following authors:

  • Alice Adams (Second Chances – 1988)
  • Isabel Allende (Daughter of Fortune – 1999)
  • Maya Angelou (I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings – 1969)
  • Gertrude Atherton (The House of Lee – 1940)
  • Albert Benard de Russailh (Last Adventure – 1851)
  • Ambrose Bierce (The Death of Halpin Frayser – 1891)
  • Herb Caen (Herb Caen’s San Francisco – 1957)
  • Philip K. Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? – 1968)
  • Dave Eggers (A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius – 2000)
  • Lawrence Ferlinghetti (Dog – 1958)
  • Allen Ginsberg (Sunflower Sutra – 1956)
  • Andrew Sean Greer (The Confessions of Max Tivoli – 2004)
  • Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon – 1930)
  • Robert Hass (Bookbuying in the Tenderloin – 1967)
  • Bob Kaufman (No More Jazz at Alcatraz)
  • Maxine Hong Kingston (China Men – 1980)
  • Jack Kerouac (On the Road – 1957)
  • Gus Lee (China Boy – 1991)
  • Armistead Maupin (Tales of the City – 1978)
  • Czeslaw Milosz (Visions From San Francisco Bay – 1975)
  • Alejandro Murguia (The Medicine of Memory – 2002)
  • Frank Norris (McTeague – 1899)
  • Thomas Pynchon (The Crying of Lot 49 – 1968)
  • Ishmael Reed (Earthquake Blues – 1988)
  • William Saroyan (The Living and the Dead – 1936)
  • John Steinbeck (Travels with Charley – 1961)
  • George Sterling (The Cool, Grey City of Love – 1920)
  • Robert Louis Stevenson (Arriving in San Francisco – 1879)
  • Amy Tan (The Joy Luck Club – 1989)
  • Michelle Tea (Valencia – 2000)
  • Hunter S. Thompson (The Great Shark Hunt – 1964)
  • Mark Twain (Early Rising, As Regards Excursions to the Cliff House – 1864)
  • Sean Wilsley (On the Glory of It All – 2005)

crossposted at mirabilu dictu

It’s not poetry folks but I can’t possibly resist.  Kate Miller-Heidke: